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Li Zhong Wan 理中丸 or Li Zhong Tang 利中湯 - Regulate the Middle Formula

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Original price
$ 30.00 USD
from $ 30.00 USD
Current price $ 30.00 USD

also known as Ren Shen Tang - Ginseng and Ginger Combination

Shen Clinic TCM advice

Origin of LI ZHONG WAN

Shang Han Lun - Discussion of Cold Induced Disorders

Generally used for
  • Acute or chronic gastritis
  • Acute or chronic gastroenteritis
  • Gastric weakness
  • Gastric or duodenal ulcers
  • Gastroptosis
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Chronic colitis
  • Candidiasis
  • Chronic bronchitis
  • Obstruction of the chest
  • Oral herpes
  • Functional uterine bleeding
  • Gastrectasis
Formula Actions
  • Warms the Middle Burner
  • Dispels Cold 
  • Strengthens the Spleen and Stomach 
  • Builds Central Qi
TCM DX
  • Spleen Yang Deficiency
  • Stomach Cold
  • Small Intestine Deficiency Cold
  • Middle Jiao Yang Deficiency
  • Tai Yin Shi (Spleen and Kidney Yang Deficiency - P: Slow and tight)
  • Tai Yin Xu (abdominal pain)
  • Sudden turmoil disorder (marked by absence of thirst)
  • Painful Obstruction in chest due to Upper Jiao Yang Deficiency
  • Cold in chest during recovery from chronic illness (causes spitting of fluids)
  • Loss of Blood due to Spleen Yang Deficiency
  • Chronic childhood convulsions

 

Safety and Contraindications of LI ZHONG WAN

  • Contraindicated for those with External Wind Invasion with fever.
  • Contraindicated for those with Yin Deficiency.
  • Use with caution during pregnancy.
  • For those with sudden turmoil disorder, stop when diarrhea and vomiting have stopped.

Pregnant and nursing women should consult their healthcare provider before using any supplement.

Traditional Chinese Medicine is powerful and reliable, but it can be complex. As TCM is not based on symptoms alone, self-diagnosis and self-treatment aren't recommended. Best to start a low cost online-herbal-consultation.

LI ZHONG WAN Ingredients

  1. Gan Jiang (Rhizoma Zingiberis)
  2. Ren Shen (Ginseng Panax)
  3. Bai Zhu (Rhizoma Atractylodis)
  4. Zhi Gan Cao (Radix Glycyrrhizae)

Dosage and Administration of LI ZHONG WAN

Granules: 2-4 grams, taken 2-3 times a day, best on an empty stomach

Whole Herbs: Using a container made of ceramic, glass, or stainless steel (no aluminum, iron or copper) boil 1 packet of herbs in 2-3 quarts of water for until 2 cups of medicine remain. Strain herbs; save and refrigerate for a second boiling. Drink 1 cup in the AM. And 1 cup in the PM. If desired, repeat the following day, using the saved herbs from the refrigerator.

Tips on Boiling Chinese Herbal Decoctions

The potent odors and flavors of Chinese herbs are legendary. Boiling the herbs and drinking the tea will provide the fullest experience of these medicines. Commonly, Chinese herbs are boiled for 20 - 40 minutes, the dregs are strained out and the "tea" is taken warm or at room temperature. Boiling times are averaged according to the composition of the formula. Flower and leaf will yield medicine in 5 -20 minutes. Roots take 20 to 40 minutes; Shells and minerals must cook for at least one hour. A few herbs, like mint or tangerine peel, must be quick-boiled for only 1-5 minutes lest they loose their valuable volatile oils. These herbs are added separately to the boiling mixture just before completion. 

Commonly, Chinese herbs are boiled for 20 - 40 minutes, the dregs are strained out and the "tea" is taken warm or at room temperature. Boiling times are averaged according to the composition of the formula. Flower and leaf will yield medicine in 5 -20 minutes. Roots take 20 to 40 minutes; Shells and minerals must cook for at least one hour. A few herbs, like mint or tangerine peel, must be quick-boiled for only 1-5 minutes to retain their volatile oils. These herbs are added separately to the boiling mixture just before completion.

 

* What’s the Difference Between, PIAN, WAN, TANG, SAN, SHUI and GAO?

  • PIAN = Tablet (modern looking pill)
  • WAN = Pill (old-style or handmade pill, or black teapill)
  • TANG = Water Decoction (boiled whole herbs)
  • SAN = Powder (milled or granulated)
  • SHUI = Tincture (extract with alcohol or other solvent)
  • GAO = Paste (topical unguent or plaster)

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the US Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Pregnant or nursing women should consult their health care provider before taking any supplement.

High-Potency Granules or Whole Herbs: 100g Granules - Custom Made