BAI SHI TANG

$ 54.00
Choose Bai Shi Tang Granules or Whole Herbs

Shen Clinic TCM Advice

Bai Shi Tang Uses

  • Gallstones
  • Cholelithiasis
  • Clears Heat
  • Drains Dampness
  • Clears the Gallbladder
  • Damp-Heat in the Liver and Gallbladder
  • Right-sided rib distention and pain
  • Abdominal distention and fullness
  • Palpable pain in the Gallbladder region
  • Dry mouth with a bitter taste
  • Thirst with no desire to drink
  • Alternating chills and fever

Bai Shi Tang Ingredients

Pharmaceutical Name
Pin Yin Name
%
Rhubarb Root and Rhizome Da Huang 20
Phellodendri Bark Huang Bai 20
Scutellariae Rhizome Huang Qin 30
Aucklandiae Root Mu Xiang 15
Aurantii Fruit Zhi Ke 15

 

Bai Shi Tang Safety and Side Effects

Herbs can be very potent, but using them can be quite complex; Your health outcome may benefit from professional advice. Self diagnosis and treatment aren't recommended for difficult, chronic, or reoccurring conditions. Best to begin a Televisit or E-Mail Consultation.

Bai Shi Tang Dosage

Granules: 2-4 grams, taken 2-3 times a day, best on an empty stomach, or as prescribed

Whole Herbs: Using a container made of ceramic, glass, or stainless steel (no aluminum, iron or copper) boil 1 packet (50 grams) of herbs in 2-3 quarts of water for until 2 cups of medicine remain. Strain herbs; save and refrigerate for a second boiling. Drink 1 cup in the AM. And 1 cup in the PM. If desired, repeat the following day, using the saved herbs from the refrigerator.


Herbs can be absorbed up to 30% better when taken on an empty stomach. Allow at least a half hour after taking herbs before eating or taking additional medicines. There are some exceptions. If your medicine proves difficult to digest, try taking it with food or after eating. Some doctors believe that formulas designed for the upper body should be taken after eating. Some medicines are best taken with other liquids such as wine (injuries or vascular problems), broth (to aid digestion of the herbs), or salt water (messenger to the Kidneys).

 

The Last Word In A Formula Is Usually TANG, SAN, WAN, PIAN, SHUI, GAO, or YIN. What Does this Mean?

  • PIAN = Tablet (modern looking pill)
  • WAN = Pill (old-style or handmade pill, or black teapill)
  • TANG = Water Decoction (boiled whole herbs)
  • SAN = Powder (milled or granulated)
  • SHUI = Tincture (extract with alcohol or other solvent)
  • GAO = Paste (topical unguent or plaster)
  • YIN = Beverage

Information is for educational purposes and is not meant to substitute for the advice of your health care provider. These statements have not been evaluated by the US Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease

 

 This product is custom compounded and cannot be returned, refunded, or exchanged. 

 

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