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Food as Medicine: How to Balance Your Diet

Food as Medicine


"Modern medicine seems to ignore the obvious: foods can stimulate body processes and potentially trigger (or relieve) countless pathologic events..." - A Patients's Guide to Chinese Medicine

 

Healing With Natural Foods

"Modern medicine seems to ignore the obvious: foods can stimulate body processes and potentially trigger (or relieve) countless pathologic events." A Patients's Guide to Chinese Medicine

Dietary imbalances or extremes will negatively affect the organs and the qi. An excessively stimulating diet for example, will stimulate body processes, triggering infinite variations of inflammation, fever, hyperactivity, or hormonal abnormalities.

Such patterns appear as fevers, sweats, insomnia, hyperthyroid, inflammatory skin conditions, among others. These conditions will be worsened by over-consumption of foods considered "hot", stimulating, or yang in nature. Overstimulated people may benefit from foods that are considered "cool", "calming", or "yin".

Conversely, those who have cold or "yang deficient" conditions such as low blood pressure, hypersomnia, sciatica, hypothyroid, Hashimoto's complex, may do better with a more stimulating (yang) diet.

Cooking can affect the stimulation properties of food. Boiling and steaming food will result in cooler (yin) foods while frying and barbecuing foods results in more stimulating (yang) foods. 

Keep in mind, when altering your diet, make moderation the rule. Changes are most sustainable when they are introduced gradually. 

Dietary imbalances or extremes will negatively affect the organs and the qi. An excessively stimulating diet for example, will stimulate body processes, triggering infinite variations of inflammation, fever, hyperactivity, or hormonal abnormalities.

Such patterns appear as fevers, sweats, insomnia, hyperthyroid, inflammatory skin conditions, among others. These conditions will be worsened by over-consumption of foods considered "hot", stimulating, or yang in nature. Overstimulated people may benefit from foods that are considered "cool", "calming", or "yin".

Conversely, those who have cold or "yang deficient" conditions such as low blood pressure, hypersomnia, sciatica, hypothyroid, Hashimoto's complex, may do better with a more stimulating (yang) diet.

Cooking can affect the stimulation properties of food. Boiling and steaming food will result in cooler (yin) foods while frying and barbecuing foods results in more stimulating (yang) foods.

Keep in mind, when altering your diet, make moderation the rule. Changes are most sustainable when they are introduced gradually.

STIMULATING Foods
NEUTRAL Foods
CALMING Foods

 

Apricots*
Artichoke
Basil
Beef*
Black tea
Butter
Butterfish
Carp*
Cayenne
Celery*
Cherries
Chestnuts
Chicken
Chili
Cinnamon
Chives
Coconut
Coconut milk
Cod
Coffee
Coriander
Dates
Egg yolk
Fennel
Garlic
Ginger
Goose*
Grapes*
Green onion
Ham
Lamb
Malt
Mussels
Mustard
Mustard Greens
Nectarine
Oats
Olives
Onions
Oolong tea
Parsley
Peach
Pepper
Pineapple*
Pine nut
Plums*
Safflower
Shrimp
Soy oil
Sugar, brown
Sweet potato
Turkey
Turmeric
Vinegar
Walnuts
Wine

 

 

 

 

Almonds
Apples**
Artichoke,
Jerusalem
Beans, Kidney**
Bean sprouts
Beets
Black mushrooms
Blueberries
Cabbage
Carrots
Catfish
Cauliflower
Carob
Cheese
Clams**
Coconut Oil
Corn
Currant
Eel
Figs
Guava
Grits
Honey
Huckleberries
Mackerel
Maple Syrup
Milk
Nutmeg
Okra
Olive Oil
Papaya
Peanuts
Pecans
Perch
Pinto Beans
Pork
Potatoes
Pumpkin Seeds
Quail
Raisin*
Rice
Sardines
Sesame seeds
Shark
Shiitake Mushroom
Sugar, white
Strawberries
String bean
Sturgeon
Tapioca
Taro
Turnip
Vanilla
Whitefish
Winter squash
Yam
Yogurt

 

 

 

 

Abalone
Agar
Banana
Barley
Beer
Beans**
Bean curd**
Bran
Buckwheat
Cottage cheese
Crab
Cucumber
Duck**
Eggplant
Egg, white
Frog's Legs
Gluten
Kelp
Lettuce
Lotus Root
Malt
Mango
Marrow
Melon
Millet
Mulberries
Mung Beans
Mushrooms
Octopus
Oysters
Pears
Peas
Persimmons
Pumpkin
Rabbit
Rock salt
Rhubarb
Seaweed
Sesame oil*
Snails
Spirulina
Sugar, cane
Summer squash
Sunflower seeds
Tangerine
Tea, green
Tofu
Tomato
Water Chestnut
Watercress
Watermelon
Wheat
Wheatberries
Wheat germ
White fungus

 

 

 

 

 



*Classified in some texts as stimulating and in others as neutral.

*Classified in some texts as calming and in others as neutral.



Information about Chinese medicine on this site is provided for educational purposes and is not meant to substitute for the advice of your own physician or other medical professional. Shen Herb Inc. makes no claims as to efficacy or safety of herbs or herbal medicine appearing on this site. Information and statements regarding dietary supplements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

 

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